Bills Great Meal Personal Chef Service in Long Island – Offering healthy cooking for your dinner parties, birthday parties, holiday meals, low fat meals, kosher meals and provide cooking lessons, gift certificates, healthy meals, special dietary needs at your own home kitchen in Suffolk & Nassau County, the Hamptons, Easthampton, Southampton, Sag Harbor, Watermill, Westhampton, Cold Spring Harbor, Northport, Centerport and Mutton town.


Chef Bill McCabe
Personal Chef


Proud Member of American
Personal Chef Association


Experience the fun of cooking lessons

April 13th, 2012 by Chef Bill

Discover the art of culinary perfection with a private cooking lesson in the comfort of your kitchen.

Learn how to cook up a storm in the company of family friends and have lots of fun while doing it.
Watch in awe as Bill McCabe ‘Executive Chef’ creates delicious dishes, talking you through every step before you roll up your sleeves and put your knowledge into practice.

You will be taken through each stage, from meal preparation to cooking tips, and have the chance to ask all those questions you’ve always wanted to ask. After all the cooking is done, you get to enjoy the delicious fruits of your hard work.

High Lights
Cooking lesson held in the comfort of your home.

Enjoy restaurant quality food prepared in your kitchen

Everything is planned and organized in advance by Chef Bill

Nothing to do and no mess to clear away

Prior to your cooking lesson:
You will meet with Chef Bill at least 10 days prior to your lesson to discuss your interests and requirements. At this time, you will also have the opportunity to discuss any special dietary requirements.

Below is a sample menu:

Shrimp Scampi Firemen Style
Shrimp lightly simmered in a broth made of butter, lot’s of GARLIC stock, lemon juice, parsley Salt n Pepper.
Served with “Thick Crusted Bread” for Dipping!

Sweet & Savory Stuffed Veal Rolls with a Mustard Pan Sauce
Scaloppini cutlets of veal stuffed with prosciutto Di Parma, olives, raisins, parsley, lemon, Parmigianino and mozzarella. Served in a sauce made of garlic, onion, fresh thyme, tomato paste, Dijon and stock.

Baked Risotto with Peas, Spinach & Parmesan
Onion, Arborio rice, spinach fat free less- sodium broth, nutmeg, parmesan and peas simmered and baked.

Broccoli with Red Pepper Flakes and Toasted Garlic

Apple – Berry Crisp
Served with Ben & Jerry’s

Contact Chef Bill today!

The Berry Best

March 9th, 2012 by Chef Bill

Strawberries are a true favorite of my clients, but they are also extremely delicate and must be handled with tender loving care prior to serving. I follow these handling guidelines to assure great tasting berries.

1) Don’t wash strawberries until just before they are served. Wash with a gently spray of cool water. Do not soak.

2) Remove the green caps only after the berries are washed. Otherwise, water gets inside the berries and breaks down the flavor and texture.

3) Remove caps with a light twist or with the point of a paring knife or tomato shark. Try not to remove any of the berries itself.

Bills Great Meals Tip
Strawberries do not ripen after being picked. Look for plump, firm berries with good, even color and glossy skins. Green caps should all be in place.
Do not store for more than a few days in your refrigerator, or the strawberries will lose flavor and color.
Enjoy Chef Bill

Chicken Soup for Children

January 12th, 2012 by Chef Bill

Below is a a chicken soup recipe that I make for my 12 year old daughter. Like most parents it is a challenge to prepare meals that my daughter likes and does not complain about. As an added bonus my wife enjoy’s the soup also!

Ingredients
2 each, 1 quart boxes organic chicken stock (Imagine brand is good)
2 each, 8 ounce organic skinless, boneless chicken breast
5 carrots, peeled and chopped into small pieces
3 celery stocks, chopped into small pieces
1/2 onion, chopped, ¼” dice
3 cloves garlic, peeled but left whole
1 large handful of parsley, tied with kitchen string
1 cup of any or any combo of the following frozen peas, fresh or frozen corn, fresh or frozen broccoli chopped into bite-size pieces, zucchini chopped finely, or any other veggies you have on-hand that your kids might like.
1 cup of cooked macaroni elbow pasta (optional).
Salt and pepper, to taste.
Time: 30 minutes, from start to finish

In a large saucepan, add chicken stock, chicken breast, carrots, celery, onion, garlic and parsley. Bring to a boil and simmer until chicken is fully poached, about 20 minutes.

Remove chicken breast with a slotted spoon and place on a cutting board. Remove parsley and discard. Chop chicken into very small pieces and return to pot with vegetables. Simmer everything until veggies are cooked through. Add cooked macaroni elbows, salt and pepper to taste.

Happy Eating! Chef Bill

Maple Roasted Butternut Squash

October 5th, 2011 by Chef Bill

Butternut Squash

Below is one of my favorite Butternut Squash recipes to prepare, give it a try and enjoy.
Happy Eating – Chef Bill!

Termed Winter Squash because they keep for three months in cool, dry storage (between 45 to 50°F), in other words, all winter, now is the perfect time to enjoy Butternut Squash. The exterior color ranges from a yellow to a light tan. Inside, the flesh is orange and has a sweet, nutty taste that is similar to a pumpkin.

Maple Roasted Butternut Squash
Ingredients:
• 2 butternut squashes, halved lengthwise with seeds cleaned out
• 1/2 cup butter
• 1/3 cup pure maple syrup
• 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon

Preparation:
Preheat oven to 400°. Score cut side of butternut squash diagonally in two directions and place cut side up in a deep baking dish. Melt butter in saucepan over medium heat, add maple syrup and cinnamon. Stir until blended. Brush butter mixture over squash. Cover bottom of baking pan with water and bake in oven for 50 to 60 minutes, or until squash becomes tender and edges are browned.

Dinner Party in Your Home

April 14th, 2011 by Chef Bill

Let Chef Bill provide you with a delicious Healthy menu for your dinner party!

Fresh Vegetable Crudités’ Platter
Baby carrot, cucumber, red and yellow peppers served with horseradish dipping sauce.

Shrimp Cocktail
Large Shrimp boiled with crab boil spices, served with zesty cocktail sauce, horseradish and lemon wedges.

Won ton Wrapped Chicken
Chicken marinated with brown sugar, salt, garlic, rice wine vinegar, olive oil, and soy sauce. Sealed in a won ton envelope, and steamed. Accompanied with an Apricot Dipping Sauce.

Tender Greens with Roasted Beet’s
Gourmet Greens, goat cheese, roasted beets and vine ripe tomatoes. Served with Citrus Vinaigrette.

Pan Seared Chicken Breast with Herb Jus
Skin-on chicken breast, cut airline style*. Seasoned with Salt n pepper and pan seared till golden. Served with a pan sauce made of white wine, garlic, thyme, rosemary, unsalted butter, and chives.

Garlic Mashed Potatoes
Russet potatoes, garlic cloves, milk, butter sea salt n pepper.

Balsamic – Glazed Filet Mignon
Beef tenderloin steaks seasoned with sea salt and pepper. Broiled till medium rare and drizzled with a balsamic glaze made of garlic, crushed red pepper, wine, low – sodium soy sauce, balsamic vinegar and honey.

Pan-Roasted Asparagus with Lemon
Asparagus, olive oil, garlic, lemon rind, rosemary, salt n pepper.

Pecan Pie
Pecans, eggs, sugar, corn syrup, butter, pure vanilla and dash of sea salt carefully blended together. Baked in a Traditional crust served with Ben & Jerry’s –“ chocolate and vanilla”.

High Protein – Low Carb Diet 3.21

March 21st, 2011 by Chef Bill

Below is the “High Protein – Low Carb” menu I prepared for one of my valued clients today. This weeks nutritional food that I high lighted below are spicy Chickpeas* which were soaked over night and prepared “the old fashion – healthy way” not canned.

Pork Provencal
Pork tenderloin dusted with seasoned whole wheat flour and quickly sautéed. Gently simmered with onion, garlic, tomato, rosemary, thyme, black olives and capers. Served with Roasted -Spaghetti squash.

Pan – Seared Striped Bass All’amattriciana
Striped Bass seasoned lightly and seared till golden. Garnished with sautéed pancetta, onion, crushed pepper, garlic, grape tomatoes and balsamic vinegar. Served with Broccoli, red pepper flakes and toasted garlic.

Grilled Lemon Chicken
Free range chicken marinated with lemon, extra virgin olive oil and garlic seasoned with lemon pepper.
Served with Grilled Asparagus.

Cumin-Crusted Chilean Sea Bass
Sea bass rubbed with cumin, sea salt, freshly ground black pepper. Seared until golden.
Served with Stir-fried Asian vegetables.

5 each – Side Salad with assorted vegetables and spicy chickpeas*
Low fat, low Carb Italian Dressing

Brief History of Chickpeas (Garbanzo beans)

There is evidence that the chickpea originated in Persia and that they were a staple of the ancient Greeks and Romans. Spanish and Portuguese explorers introduced chickpeas to the subtropical regions during the 16th century.

Hummus is made from chickpeas, tahini, garlic, olive oil, lemon juice and salt, and falafal is also made from chickpeas and/or fava beans. Chickpeas can be cooked in stews or curries, used cold in salads, and also ground and used as flour.

Nutrients in Chickpeas
Chickpeas are an excellent source of the essential trace element molybdenum. They are a very good source of fiber, folic acid, and manganese. They are an important source of macro nutrients, good source of protein, containing almost twice the amount of protein compared to cereal grains, as well as minerals such as iron, magnesium, copper, and zinc.

Preliminary evidence suggests the consumption of chickpeas may be beneficial for correcting dyslipidaemia (when the concentration of cholesterol or lipids in the blood exceeds normal limits), and preventing diabetes.

Healthy Eating….. Bill

Healthy Meals – 2011

January 3rd, 2011 by Chef Bill

Healthy Meals. – By: Long Island Personal Chef – Bill McCabe

House calls for Healthy Meals

Outsourcing our lives: Personal Chefs cater to a growing clientele — and not just the rich

Good intentions of eating healthy and staying fit often clash with the overbooked lifestyles many people lead. Therefore; some of those consumers “who want it all but still want to maintain their sanity” are turning to personal chefs.
Personal chefs have found a growing customer base not only among working couples with children but also single professionals on the run as well as people with dietary restrictions and seniors who want to remain independent.

Unlike the private chef, the personal chef will shop and prepare the week’s meals all in a day, leaving clients with special preparation instructions. The customer essentially is paying for a supply of meals made with fresh ingredients and none of the preservatives and nitrates of frozen dinners and take-out food, said Candy Wallace, founder and executive director of the American Personal Chef Association. Her organization estimates the number of personal chefs nationwide at 8,000.

“My clients are basically dual-income families who do not have time to shop or cook,” said Bill McCabe of Hauppauge-based Bills Great Meals. McCabe served as Houlihans Culinary Director and as General Manager for LongHorn Steakhouse.

Norman Haywood, a family practitioner who lives in Northport, warmed to the idea of a personal chef after comparing the price tag of frequently eating out against the cost of McCabe’s services. Haywood and his wife, Jeanette, a nurse who runs the busy practice with him, have a 25-year-old son attending SUNY Old Westbury and a 14-year-old daughter. They figured they were paying anywhere from $35 to $70 five to six times a week on eating out or ordering takeout. Now they spend between $450 and $525 for two weeks of McCabe’s personal chef services.

“We figured it was really cheaper than eating out, plus eating out became mundane,” Haywood said. “It was either Chinese or Italian. We were excited when Bill came with so many different ideas about so many different dishes.”

Selecting The Right Turkey for your Holiday Meal!

November 21st, 2010 by Chef Bill

Buying the right turkey for Thanksgiving dinner involves a lot more than a quick trip to the supermarket: you have to consider how many people you’re serving, how much time the bird will need to thaw, and even whether you have enough room to store the turkey. Here’s how to get this most basic part of the holiday right.

Selecting the right turkey is essential to success of your dinner. You’ll want about 3/4 to 1 pound per person, so do the math before shopping. All turkeys in the supermarket would make good choices, as they’re all required to meet USDA standards for quality and safety. However, there are different grades out there to choose from. For your Thanksgiving dinner, you’ll definitely want to choose Grade A. Many turkeys are pre-basted, which is a great choice if you want a turkey that’s guaranteed to be moist and delicious. You will definitely want to make sure that the turkey you choose has a pop up timer. This will ensure that your turkey gets cooked to perfection. You can choose from fresh or frozen turkeys. They’re both good, but there are some benefits to buying a fresh turkey. For one, there’s no thawing time required. Also a fresh turkey is normally a little more juicer than a frozen one.

Storing Your Turkey
Proper storage is essential to health. A frozen turkey can be safely stored for a long time in the freezer; however a fresh one will only keep for a few days. So, if you choose a fresh turkey for your meal, be sure to purchase it around 2 – 3 days before Thanksgiving to ensure optimum freshness.
If you are using a frozen Turkey you will need to defrost it in the refrigerator (depending upon size) for 3 – 4 days prior to cooking it.
DO NOT DEFROST TURKEY AT ROOM TEMPERATURE

DJ’s Chicken Soup for Kids

June 29th, 2010 by Chef Bill

Ingredients
2 boxes organic chicken stock (Imagine brand is good)
I large organic skinless, boneless chicken breast
5 carrots, chopped into small pieces
3 celery stocks, chopped into small pieces
1/2 onion, chopped, ¼” dice
3 cloves garlic, peeled but left whole
1 large handful of parsley, tied with kitchen string
1 cup of any or any combo of the following frozen peas, fresh or frozen corn, fresh or frozen broccoli chopped into bite-size pieces, zucchini chopped finely, or any other veggies you have on-hand that your kids might like.
1/2 cup of leftover plain pasta, any shape, already cooked (optional)
Salt and pepper, to taste
Time: 30 minutes, from start to finish

In a large saucepan, add chicken stock, chicken breast (no need to chopped in yet), carrots, celery, onion, garlic and parsley. Bring to a boil and simmer until chicken is fully poached, about 20 minutes.

Remove chicken breast with a slotted spoon and place on a cutting board. Remove parsley and discard. Chop chicken into very small pieces and return to pot with vegetables and pasta, if using. Simmer everything until veggies are cooked through. Add salt and pepper to taste.